‘Dark Phoenix’ Film Review: X-Men Saga Wraps Up With Overly Familiar, Mediocre Sequel

The most impressive thing about Simon Kinberg’s “Dark Phoenix,” the 12th movie in 20th Century Fox’s wildly inconsistent “X-Men” superhero franchise, is that it’s not the worst one. It’s rather embarrassingly scripted and acted...

‘The Lavender Scare’ Film Review: Doc Explores Government’s Pre-Stonewall Anti-LGBTQ Discrimination

Just in time for the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots comes “The Lavender Scare,” a compact and fairly well-made documentary on the purging of homosexuals from government jobs; it began with an executive...

‘This One’s for the Ladies’ Film Review: Male Stripper Doc Has Plenty of Nudity...

The best description of director Gene Graham’s (“The Godfather of Disco”) stripper documentary, “This One’s for the Ladies,” comes from one of the film’s subjects, naughty dancer enthusiast Michele Moore, who says, in an...

‘A Night at Switch n’ Play’ Film Review: Transgressive Drag Outshines Pedestrian Doc Direction

A subversive property fully integrated into mainstream consciousness, “RuPaul’s Drag Race” has popularized the inherently defiant, shape-shifting art of drag even among audiences outside of the LGBTQ community. Though its legacy of visibility is...

‘Pavarotti’ Film Review: Ron Howard Doc Humanizes Opera Legend

Watching Ron Howard enlist an all-star cast of experts, industry luminaries and celebrities to catalog Luciano Pavarotti’s many, many achievements as a singer, it’s easy to think that the filmmaker chose hagiography as his...

‘The Spy Behind Home Plate’ Film Review: Documentary Recounts Moe Berg’s Improbably True Life...

There aren’t a lot of sports stars who could claim to be as interesting as Moe Berg, a Major League baseball player who spoke nearly a dozen languages, blew audiences away on quiz shows,...

‘Our Time’ Film Review: Mexican Visionary Carlos Reygadas Explores the Limits of Fidelity

Transcending the metaphysical impenetrability of “Post Tenebras Lux” and evading the unrestrained grotesqueness of “Battle in Heaven,” illustrious Mexican auteur Carlos Reygadas has spawned his most narratively accessible and emotionally open work to date,...

‘Wild Rose’ Film Review: Jessie Buckley Shines as a Scottish Singer with Nashville Dreams

The story at the heart of “Wild Rose” is one that has been told time and time again, yet director Tom Harper (“The Woman in Black 2”) and screenwriter Nicole Taylor (“Secret Diary of...

‘Being Frank’ Film Review: Jim Gaffigan Plays a Bigamist — But Is This a...

Miranda Bailey’s narrative directorial debut “Being Frank” is a comedy about male hypocrisy set in 1992 that dives into many intriguing ideas and issues and gives us a lot to consider. This is commendable...

‘The Raft’ Film Review: Compelling Doc Recounts Seagoing Social Experiment With Unexpected Results

What could possibly go wrong when ten beautiful strangers — six women and four men — are thrown together in cramped quarters for a closely observed transatlantic voyage? Surprisingly, not the kind of wrong...

‘American Woman’ Film Review: Sienna Miller Digs Deep Into Shallow Story of Struggle

“American Woman” is what happens when you put a male director and screenwriter together to tell a story about their idea of a woman’s journey through traumatic events, time, and age. Director Jake Scott...

‘Toy Story 4’ Film Review: Woody and Company Return for a Sequel That’s No...

After the unalloyed triumph that was “Toy Story 3,” did we need another sequel to the popular Pixar series? Not really. Now that “Toy Story 4” exists, does it tarnish the reputation of a...

‘Shaft’ Film Review: Old-School Swagger Meets Millennial Wokeness in Uneasy Crime-Comedy Mix

It’s always a little awkward to reexamine a beloved older film so rooted in its own era that the chance of it seeming somewhat barbaric today is inevitable. But our current culture seeks not...

‘Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes’ Film Review: Documentary Crams Ten Pounds of Jazz...

Jazz is an art form that can be examined any number of ways — historically, racially, structurally, even philosophically — but choosing one of those runs the risk of ignoring the equally-important rest. Sophie...

‘Plus One’ Film Review: Maya Erskine Shines in Wedding-Season Romcom

Even indie romantic comedies seem to be getting into the more-is-bigger-is-hopefully-better ethos of action movies. Add six weddings to the titular number in that 1994 Hugh Grant-Andie MacDowell classic of the genre (then subtract...

‘Hampstead’ Review: Diane Keaton and Brendan Gleeson Ignite Senior Sparks

Calling a film “Hampstead” invites immediate comparisons with “Notting Hill,” the Richard Curtis-penned rom-com that put that particular West London enclave on the global map back in 1999. Director Joel Hopkins may be hoping for...

‘Rolling Thunder Revue’ Film Review: Martin Scorsese Chronicles Bob Dylan’s Legendary Bicentennial Tour

Longtime Bob Dylan fans know Rolling Thunder Revue as one of the enigmatic singer-songwriter’s most legendary tours, so it should come as little surprise that Martin Scorsese decided to indulge in some mythmaking of...

‘Funan’ Film Review: Bleakly Powerful Animated Film Captures Real-Life Historical Horror

There’s no sensationalism in Denis Do’s “Funan,” a harrowing animated drama about a family struggling to survive the Khmer Rouge revolution in Cambodia in the late 1970s. It’s a film about dulling the senses...

‘Papi Chulo’ Film Review: Matt Bomer Stars in Misguided Cross-Cultural Bromance

Well-intentioned but at times insensitive, “Papi Chulo” is a complicated movie. It wants so badly to do the right thing when the situation is all wrong. Written and directed by John Butler (“Handsome Devil”), “Papi...

‘The Fall of the American Empire’ Film Review: Denys Arcand’s Money-Laundering Caper Isn’t Always...

You could be forgiven for confusing the title of Canadian filmmaker Denys Arcand’s latest, the capitalist crime lark “The Fall of the American Empire,” with his 1986 battle-of-the-sexes talkathon, “The Decline of the American...

‘Mouthpiece’ Review: Two Actresses Bring One Woman’s Duality to Life

“Mouthpiece,” Patricia Rozema’s defiantly experimental drama, gives voice to many conflicts. Most of these are cleaved bluntly down the middle: internal dichotomies, familial divides, generational gaps, gender inequality. But it’s the singular, and universal,...

‘Domino’ Film Review: Brian De Palma Half-Heartedly Directs Terrorism Thriller

Nikolaj Coster-Waldau is dangling off a rooftop. To his left, he can see his best friend through a window, dying from a slit throat. To his right, he can see the murderer, also hanging...

‘Ma’ Film Review: Octavia Spencer Outshines a Would-Be Campy Thriller That Is Neither

Every year on the first Monday of May, the Met Gala takes place in New York City, and the crème de la crème of the fashion world and Hollywood dress to the nines in...

‘Godzilla: King of the Monsters’ Film Review: Hollywood Finally Gets Kaiju Right

Hollywood finally gets kaiju big battles right in “Godzilla: King of the Monsters,” a film whose approach is part 21st-century action franchise (kick in the action early, then keep one-upping it until the big...

‘Always Be My Maybe’ Film Review: Ali Wong and Randall Park Break the Rom-Com...

“Mahogany” has long been regarded as a classic romantic film that has pretty much everything you crave in the genre: sex, luxurious fashion montages, and a hot couple. But you know what stops it...

‘Beanpole’ Film Review: Dark Russian Drama Delves Into Postwar Purgatory

An immaculately color-coded, visually resplendent serving of European art-house severity, “Beanpole” brings its sharp performances and even sharper production design to a landscape wholly untouched by humor. Which is, in itself, a kind of...

‘Sibyl’ Film Review: Cannes Competition Ends With a Woody Allen-Style Comedy

As the say, nature abhors a vacuum. So once it became clear that longtime Cannes stalwart Woody Allen probably wouldn’t be turning up on the red carpet anytime soon, you knew that someone would eventually...

‘Halston’ Film Review: Corporation Crushes Couture in Cautionary Documentary

In the 1960s, early in his career as a milliner for New York’s Bergdorf Goodman, Roy Halston Frowick, who would come to be known only by that middle name, attended a dinner in the...

‘It Must Be Heaven’ Film Review: Palestinian Comedy Finds Absurdity Around the World

More than a few festival-goers must have woken up in rough shape after last night’s long trip to the club with Abdellatif Kechiche, and to their credit, the Cannes Film Festival seems to have...

‘Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo’ Film Review: Abdellatif Kechiche Trolls Cannes With NSFW Excess

Just when you think you’ve seen it all before, director Abdellatif Kechiche goes and drops something as toxically indulgent as “Mektoub, My Love: Intermezzo,” a three-and-half-hour-long provocation that will now make the “Blue Is...

‘Echo in the Canyon’ Film Review: Documentary Takes a Hazy Look at a Key...

There are probably four or five documentaries’ worth of material to pull from the Laurel Canyon music scene and the cultural movements of late 1960s Los Angeles, but even if “Echo in the Canyon”...

‘After Maria’ Film Review: Devastating Doc Explores the Human Toll of a Hurricane’s Aftermath

It’s been nearly two years since Hurricane Maria ripped through Puerto Rico, devastating thousands of homes, stripping families of electricity for months and killing nearly 3,000 people. While much time has passed, and the...

‘The Secret Life of Pets 2’ Film Review: Cartoon Offers Outdated Messages About Marriage,...

Milking human’s collective affection for our furry and feathered pals, the original “The Secret Life of Pets” imposed the “Toy Story” formula on animals living in New York City in order to show us...

‘Oh Mercy’ Film Review: Is This Cop Drama a Pilot In Disguise?

As one of the Cannes Film Festival’s favorite sons, Arnaud Desplechin has been a fixture on the Croisette for more than 20 years. The director has had six films play in competition, and several others...

‘Matthias & Maxime’ Film Review: Xavier Dolan Finds Maturity at the Ripe Old Age...

From one point of view, Xavier Dolan’s career looks like a precocious, single-minded blitz. As a director (he’s also a writer and actor), he’s made eight films between 2009 and 2019, with his first...

‘Booksmart’ Film Review: Debut Director Olivia Wilde Delivers Witty Coming-of-Age Comedy

How do you begin describing the movie you have been unknowingly waiting for your entire life? Do I start by telling you how incredibly hilarious “Booksmart” is? Or do I tell you how first-time...

‘Aladdin’ (2019) Film Review: Guy Ritchie Delivers Chintzy Live-Action Remake With Will Smith

Halfway through Guy Ritchie’s live-action remake of “Aladdin,” the title character sits uncomfortably on a Rose Parade float while Will Smith leads a ramshackle chorus in a spirited but mediocre rendition of the beloved...

‘Brightburn’ Film Review: The Kid’s Not All Right, Nor Is James Gunn’s Superhero Horror...

What if Superman started out evil? And what if that was the only idea you had for your movie? Hence “Brightburn,” a wafer-thin exercise in a supposedly new genre called “superhero horror,” but what...

‘Parasite’ Film Review: Bong Joon-ho Tackles Disparity With Delicious Dark Comedy

Cannes has always offered a home to both audacious genre filmmaking and politically engaged, social issue cinema but it’s usually been an either/or proposition. Festival juries, meanwhile, have tended to celebrate one at the expense...

‘Diamantino’ Film Review: Giant Puppies and Soccer Dominate Goofball Comedy

Points for originality should go to “Diamantino,” an amusing but scattershot comedy that revolves around a world-famous Portuguese soccer star patterned in part on Cristiano Ronaldo. Co-directed and written by Gabriel Abrantes and Daniel...

‘Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood’ Film Review: A Contemplative Quentin Tarantino Still...

Quentin Tarantino has loomed over this year’s Cannes Film Festival ever since the lineup was announced on April 18 and he wasn’t on it. At the press conference to reveal this year’s slate, Cannes...

‘The Tomorrow Man’ Film Review: Blythe Danner and John Lithgow Overcome Boundaries to Find...

“The Tomorrow Man” sounds like a 1970s sci-fi film about a guy who predicts the future, but Noble Jones’ feature debut is kind of exactly the opposite, the story a guy whose fixation on...

‘Lux Aeterna’ Film Review: Gaspar Noe Wants to Mess You Up, Again

Cinematic provocateurs have flourished at the Cannes Film Festival for years, with everyone from Jean-Luc Godard to Lars von Trier coming to the Croisette with works designed to provoke, confront or even annoy an...

‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’ Film Review: Ravishing Drama Is a Feminist Tale...

You don’t need any prior knowledge in order to be wowed by Céline Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire,” a visually ravishing period drama that premiered Sunday in Cannes. Walk in blind and take...

NOS4A2 Review: AMC’s Horror Tale Is Too Slow and Mopey to Have Much Bite

After hitting the zombie jackpot with The Walking Dead, AMC is going back to the supernatural horror well once again with the creepy-crawly NOS4A2 — and to its credit, the series does boast a...

‘A Hidden Life’ Film Review: Is This Where Terrence Malick Gets His Mojo Back?

The key word in all the advance talk about Terrence Malick’s “A Hidden Life” has been linear. The film, which premiered on Sunday at the Cannes Film Festival, was supposed to mark the reclusive...

‘The Lighthouse’ Film Review: Robert Pattinson Rocks Cannes With a Portrait of Madness

Forget VR, pay no mind to 3-D and don’t even think about introducing a new frame rate — the most immersive film experience of the year can be found in “The Lighthouse,” a throwback...

‘Vivarium’ Review: Jesse Eisenberg Satire Bites Off More Than It Can Chew

Feeling simultaneously overstuffed and undercooked, Lorcan Finnegan’s “Vivarium” tries to ring a warning bell about, well, a lot of things. In the end, though, it works best as a cautionary tale about the pitfalls...

‘Family Romance, LLC’ Film Review: Love’s for Sale in Werner Herzog’s Odd New Film

In the opening scene of Werner Herzog’s new feature “Family Romance, LLC,” a well-dressed, slightly nervous-looking man stops a 12-year old girl in Tokyo and explains that he’s her father, who left the family...

‘The Whistlers’ Film Review: Romanian Wild Ride Runs on Black Humor

When Corneliu Porumboiu began making films in Romania just after the turn of the century, we knew what Romanian cinema was like — or, at least, we knew what the branch that came to...

‘Pain and Glory’ Film Review: Antonio Banderas Plays Pedro Almodóvar – Sort Of

Art imitates life in Pedro Almodóvar’s “Pain and Glory,” which screened in competition at the Cannes Film Festival on Friday evening. Or maybe it’s more accurate to say that the iconic Spanish director reimagines...

‘The Climb’ Film Review: For a Change, Cannes Does Comedy

Little out of the ordinary goes down in “The Climb.” Friends bicker and bond, families meet for the holidays, couples join together and come apart – the wheels of life keeps spinning. So the fact...

‘Little Joe’ Film Review: Cannes Gets a Horticultural Horror Flick

“Fear can affect our perception of reality,” says an inquisitive shrink about halfway through “Little Joe,” Jessica Hausner’s highbrow horticulture horror flick (say that three times fast) that premiered in the main competition at...

‘Sorry We Missed You’ Film Review: Once Again, Ken Loach Sings the Working Class...

“This isn’t going to end well,” Adam Driver says more than once in “The Dead Don’t Die,” the Jim Jarmusch zombie movie that opened the Cannes Film Festival on Tuesday. And when Ken Loach’s...

‘We Have Always Lived in the Castle’ Film Review: Sisters Hide From the World...

In Stacie Passon’s dynamic directorial debut “Concussion” (the lesbian one, not the Will Smith one), a housewife breaks free of her suburban bubble by taking on sex work in the city. With her sophomore...

‘Photograph’ Film Review: Mumbai Romance Feels Sweet but Slight

Meet-cutes are the hallmark of any romantic comedy, and although Ritesh Batra’s “Photograph” is more of a genial drama, its meet-cute is so essential to the plot, the film is named after it. Rafi (Nawazuddin...

‘For Sama’ Film Review: Syrian Documentary Finds Wrenching Personal Take on Conflict

In a lot of ways, the Cannes Film Festival premiere of “For Sama” should have felt like nothing new. After all, the film had premiered in March at the South by Southwest Film Festival...

‘The Souvenir’ Film Review: Sundance Award-Winner Weaves a Dreamy but Honest Memory Piece

In British auteur Joanna Hogg’s exquisitely composed fourth feature “The Souvenir” — winner of the Grand Jury Prize in the World Cinema Dramatic competition — a beguiling layer of innocence surrounds its central character,...

‘The Sun Is Also a Star’ Film Review: Star-Crossed Teen Romance Offers Plenty to...

“The Sun Is Also a Star,” was so painfully close to being an enjoyable experience. I should have felt swept up in Ry Russo-Young’s romantic drama about two interesting young characters from immigrant backgrounds...

‘Bull’ Film Review: Annie Silverstein Finds Signs of Life in Numb Characters

It’s probably unfair to compare Annie Silverstein’s “Bull” to Chloe Zhao’s “The Rider,” but in a way it’s hard not to. Both premiered at the Cannes Film Festival: “The Rider” at Directors’ Fortnight in...

‘Trial by Fire’ Film Review: Death Row Drama Skirts Important Issues

A perpetually alarming issue that merits interminable outrage, wrongful convictions are not news in this country. Innocent people accused of a crime, or at least individuals not dutifully proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt,...

‘The Professor and the Madman’ Film Review: Mel Gibson and Sean Penn Lack Definition...

I don’t have a copy of the Oxford English Dictionary in front of me but the OxfordDictionaries.com website defines “boredom” as “the state of feeling bored.” Which is about as insightful as anything one...

‘Pasolini’ Film Review: A Great Director’s Death, Delivered in Pieces

“Pasolini” is not a biopic of the late Italian filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini (played here by Willem Dafoe). The complicated director of “The Gospel According to St. Matthew,” “Teorema” and “Salo, or The 120...

‘John Wick 3’ Film Review: Keanu Reeves’ Assassin Returns for Mostly Enjoyable Threequel

“John Wick” movies are shameless yet rules-bound, littered with killings but bejeweled with old-world niceties. Director Chad Stahelski’s third installment in the R-rated franchise of one-man-army vengeance starring Keanu Reeves as the most put-upon,...

‘The Biggest Little Farm’ Film Review: Inspirational Farm Tale Avoids Complicated Issues

There are a lot of reasons to either love or hate California, and whichever side of the political aisle you occupy, there’s no denying that much of the nation’s produce comes from the Golden...

‘The Hustle’ Film Review: Anne Hathaway and Rebel Wilson Are Robbed of a Worthwhile...

There is a smart movie nestled somewhere in director Chris Addison’s romp, “The Hustle,” but you have to weed through a whole lot of foolery to get to it. The new film is ripe...

‘Poms’ Film Review: Diane Keaton and Jacki Weaver Bring Good Cheer to Senior Sports...

There’s no shortage of spirit among the cast of “Poms,” Zara Hayes’ new cheerleading and retirement-age comedy hybrid, but not even this much pep can cover up all of the film’s missteps. Although it’s...

‘My Son’ Film Review: Efficient French Thriller Sends Divorced Father to Find Missing Kid

The French thriller “My Son” is about a missing boy, an absentee dad, and a welcome lack of affectation in selling its unnerving premise. Less a vigilante explosion à la “Taken” than a methodical...

‘All Is True’ Film Review: Kenneth Branagh’s Shakespeare Biopic Aims High, Falls Flat

How do we honor an icon when so little truth is known about his life? If Kenneth Branagh’s earnest Shakespearean biopic is any guide, we would do best to stick with the Bard’s own...

‘Charlie Says’ Film Review: Drama Explores Charles Manson From the POV of His ‘Girls’

Some months in advance of Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood,” a film about the Manson murders, comes Mary Harron’s “Charlie Says,” a very strained attempt to understand the motivations of the...

‘Wine Country’ Film Review: Amy Poehler Comedy Celebrates the Vintage of 50-Something Women

There was a little bit of magic floating in the air at “SNL” during the early aughts. Though the show has been on air since 1975, a fresh cast produced a dose of fresh...

All 22 Pokémon Feature Films, Ranked Worst to Best (Photos)

Let's face it, Pokémon has never been a great anime; its messy premise has always better served the mechanics of a video game than the plot of a cartoon. But regardless of format, it's...

‘Yesterday’ Film Review: Danny Boyle’s Beatles Comedy Never Comes Together

Award for lamest idea of the year will almost certainly go to screenwriter Richard Curtis, who has imagined a world where Beatles songs no longer exist in “Yesterday.” Curtis’ twee, nudging, corny comedic voice...

‘See You Yesterday’ Film Review: Sprightly Teen Time-Travel Comedy Reveals Dark Truths

Stefon Bristol’s debut feature “See You Yesterday,” which has Spike Lee as one of its producers, revolves around the ingenuity of two 16-year-old friends, Claudette (Eden Duncan-Smith, “Roxanne Roxanne”) and Sebastian (Dante Crichlow), who...

‘The Quiet One’ Film Review: Reticent Rolling Stone Bill Wyman Shares Little of Interest...

When you think about a Rolling Stones documentary, you might expect sordid details about Mick Jagger’s or Keith Richards’ drug use and rampant sexual escapades, or even the backstory behind the band’s greatest hits...

‘Low Tide’ Film Review: Coming-of-Age Tale About Buried Treasure Digs Up Promising Talent

First-time filmmaker Kevin McMullin drew on his own background to tell a Jersey Shore story in “Low Tide,” and the personal connection shows. His coming-of-age tale doesn’t break new ground, but it does set...

‘El Chicano’ Film Review: Well-Intentioned Latinx Superhero Movie Gets More Wrong Than Right

“El Chicano” opens deep in the heart of East Los Angeles — or East Los, if you’re local — as a group of Latinx kids watches an act of vigilante justice in their neighborhood....

‘Shadow’ Film Review: Zhang Yimou Thrillingly Contemplates Duality

Grand spectacle has always been one of master Chinese director Zhang Yimou’s specialities. His wuxia epics feature staggering battles that defy gravity while placed within the context of intrigue-laden historical fictions. When you go...

‘Meeting Gorbachev’ Film Review: Werner Herzog Gets Up Close and Personal With Former Soviet...

As one watches Werner Herzog and André Singer’s documentary “Meeting Gorbachev,” the mind floats back to the words of the late Gene Siskel, the film critic who was known for, amongst other things, a...

‘Ask Dr Ruth’ Film Review: America’s Favorite Sex Therapist Gets a Cheerful, Enlightening Doc...

If Dr. Ruth Westheimer weren’t around, Mel Brooks would have had to invent a character like her to bounce off of Carl Reiner. A pint-sized, thickly accented German-Jewish survivor of the Nazis who made...

Tuca & Bertie Review: Broad City + BoJack Horseman = Fine Feathered Fun

Are you already missing the urban misadventures of Broad City? Are you also impatiently waiting for the new season of BoJack Horseman to arrive? Then I’ve got the perfect show for you.Tuca & Bertie...

‘Tolkien’ Film Review: Laughable Biopic Indulges in Infinite Great-Artist Clichés

Dome Karukoski‘s “Tolkien,” a new biopic about the celebrated author of “The Hobbit” and “The Lord of the Rings,” throws into sharp relief the hitherto unexplored tragedy of the artist’s life. Imagine it: you’re...

A Pokemon Superfan Reviews ‘Detective Pikachu’: Problems Come Out to Play in Disappointing Film...

At this point, Pokémon is everything: It’s a card game, a frenzy-inducing mobile app and several long-running anime and manga series. Pokémon’s mascot character Pikachu has helped promote the NWA biopic “Straight Outta Compton,”...

‘Detective Pikachu’ Film Review: Humans and Pokemon Pal Around in Overstuffed, Underwritten World

Is there a Pokémon whose power is to move through your eyeballs and brain and then leave absolutely no impression? Because that was my experience of watching “Detective Pikachu,” a CGI-heavy live-action/animation hybrid based...

‘XY Chelsea’ Film Review: Doc Tackles Chelsea Manning’s Very In-Progress Story

“I’m not a hero,” says Chelsea Manning toward the end of Tim Travers Hawkins’s “XY Chelsea,” a riveting but often frustrating documentary that focuses mainly on Manning’s 2017 release from jail, where she spent...

‘The Intruder’ Film Review: Dennis Quaid Stalks Homeowners in Dopey Thriller

Home invasion thrillers have given us plenty of maniacal villains hellbent on terrorizing helpless residents of cavernous houses. Whether they’re driven by dementia or greed (or both), these villains pillage, plunder, and leave the...

‘Framing John DeLorean’ Review: Meta-Doc Takes Various Tracks to Explore What Drove the Carmaker

A curious experiment that may be best suited to the freedom of a festival setting, “Framing John DeLorean” aims to finally crack the mystery of its titular subject. As we learn early on, the...

‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile’ Film Review: Zac Efron Captures Ted Bundy’s Killer...

“Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile,” the stridently descriptive and wordy title for Joe Berlinger’s narrative feature about Ted Bundy, could have been more conveniently used to refer to Lars von Trier’s “The House...

‘Long Shot’ Film Review: Charlize Theron and Seth Rogen Make a Charming, Unlikely Couple

The romantic-comedy director’s main job is to create a story so charming that it convinces viewers to suspend reality, to make them cast away logic, be dazzled and let themselves fall in love with...

‘Non-Fiction’ Film Review: Olivier Assayas Comically Mourns the Death of Literature

It’s difficult to ask hard questions about change and technology and progress — particularly to consider whether “progress” is actually progress or not — without sounding like a cranky old man, but writer-director Olivier...

‘The Kill Team’ Film Review: Nat Wolff’s Soldier Has a Crisis of Conscience in...

Andrew Briggman (Nat Wolff) is ready to go into the army. In his spare time, the young man works out and moves around his room as if avoiding enemy fire. He’s still boyish in...

‘Woodstock’ Film Review: Anniversary Doc Takes Boomers on an Evocative Trip Down Memory Lane

How do you follow one of the most critically acclaimed rock docs of all time? Michael Wadleigh’s seminal 1970 documentary “Woodstock ” was immersive and electric, a definitive, you-are-there experience rather than a here’s-what-happened...

‘UglyDolls’ Film Review: You’ve Seen This Toy Story Before

Doubling as both a colorful recycling bin for tropes and ideas from a variety of preexisting children animated features and a casting session for “The Voice”‘s next batch of hosts, Kelly Asbury’s plush-inspired film...

‘Knock Down the House’ Film Review: Rousing Documentary Follows AOC and Three Other Women...

Abolish your suspicions if you are expecting a standard-issue political campaign movie from Rachel Lears’ inspiring “Knock Down the House,” the winner of two audience awards at the 2019 Sundance Film Festival. Along with her...

‘You Don’t Nomi’ Film Review: Documentary Asks, Were We Too Hard on Camp Classic...

Jeffrey McHale’s feature debut, the “Showgirls” appreciation documentary “You Don’t Nomi,” works awfully hard to justify both its subject and its mission. But if you instantly appreciated the cleverness of its title, you’ll enjoy...

L.A.’s Finest Review: Call in the Bomb Squad for This Loud, Dumb Cop Drama

Here’s the bad news: If you’re not one of Spectrum’s 14 million or so cable subscribers, you won’t be able to watch its first original series, the Bad Boys spinoff L.A.’s Finest. Or wait,...

‘Apocalypse Now Final Cut’ Film Review: Francis Ford Coppola’s New Version Might Be the...

At the end of a weekend in which one three-hour movie broke all kinds of box-office records, another three-hour movie drew two resounding standing ovations at the Tribeca Film Festival. Of course, the three-hour movie...

‘Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice’ Review: Rock Doc Starts and Ends With...

Linda Ronstadt was always tough to figure out. And for the filmmakers behind “Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice,” which premiered on Friday night at the Tribeca Film Festival, that makes her both...

‘JT LeRoy’ Film Review: Literary Hoax Makes for a Frustrating Film

Justin Kelly’s “JT LeRoy,” tells the true story of author Laura Albert (Laura Dern), who published a series of books under the name JT LeRoy and enlisted her 25-year-old sister-in-law, Savannah Knoop (Kristen Stewart),...

‘Avengers: Endgame’ Film Review: Superhero Season Finale Gives Fan Service a Good Name

Some movies give us what we want, while others give us what we need. Claire Denis’ “High Life,” for instance, is an intense, tough viewing experience, but it offers important ideas about humanity’s future....

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