Where To Experience Canadian Cuisine In Seoul, Korea

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Like most countries in western civilizations, waves of immigration in the 19th and 20th century codified modern Canadian cuisines.  The cuisines are heavily influences by European, Asian, the Caribbean cultures.  This is similar to the rise in western cuisine in various parts of the world like Asia, particularly South Korea.

The city of Seoul is a beautiful city, a Metropolis with a mixture of modern skyscrapers, high-tech subways, pop culture, Buddhist temples, old palaces, old-fashioned open-air city and a number of restaurants representing several countries.  Local cuisines is delicious, however if Tourists would like to try other world cuisines, they would have several choices.  That was how I became aware of a Canadian bar and restaurant in Seoul.

For more than 20 years, I stopped adding meat as a part of my daily meals.  I no longer consume chicken, beef nor pork, therefore, having meals that is nutritious is very important.  This is particular challenging when visiting foreign countries where local cuisines are unfamiliar.  However, that was not the case on my Trip to South Korea.

The second night of my trip started with a search for a restaurant that could accommodate my desires.  This led me to Itaewon.  To ensure I maximize on my Korea shopping experience, I inquired about popular places to shop.  Itaewon seemed to be the most popular shopping district referred by many living in Seoul.  After Googling the name, I discovered it had several western bars and restaurants and shopping areas.

There is nothing more amazing that visiting a foreign country and utilizing the public transit system without understanding the language.  That was exactly what I did, and I did not fail.  When I arrive in Itaewon shopping district, I quickly realize this was where are Western Tourist congregate.  There were several known restaurants and stores.  The choices were abundant, however we settled on one that stood out because it had a Canadian name.

I have been married to a Canadian for more than eight years, and I have never had Canadian cuisines.  This was my opportunity to finally have it.  Canucks was the place where you could “taste Canada in Korea” as it said in the slogan.  Upon entering the establishment, I quickly realize it was an expanded version of a sports bar like Hooters without the sexy girls and uniforms or maybe a Dave & Busters.  A few differences were the breakfast meals on the menu.

There were several menu choices, however, I opt out the main dishes and went straight for a side dish. Being a self proclaimed fries connoisseur, which derive from ordering fries with almost every meal, I felt it necessary to try anything that had fries, so  I chose the “OG Poutine”.  It consists of Fries, Cheese curd and Gravy. It sounded so delicious.  However, upon receiving it, I quickly discovered I did not care for the gravy on top.   It felt like an oddity that interrupts the compliment between the fries and the melting cheese.  If I were to order this side again, I would opt out of the gravy on top and ask for it on the side.

I also ordered a Salmon Salad and Korean beer as the main course.  The beer was perfectly balanced in coldness and taste.  As usual it blended well with the salad which was had Marinated Salmon strips with a Cream cheese and Marmalade dressing laid over the freshly green lettuce and tomato.  The taste gave compulsory satisfaction which a sign of a good meal.

Although, the Salmon salad salvage the experience, I still felt overwhelmed by the poutines which I concluded would be a one experience.  This does not mean I would never try another Canadian dish, it means, I will never order fries with gravy on top again.

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Delroy has been a contributing writer for FiWEH Life for more than 10 years. He is the author of the short story The Red Myths: Beyond the Future and the Past and is also a writer for the Jamaican animated series "Fareign Yaadies". Delroy currently resides in Japan with his family where he chronicles his many experiences.

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